Exclusive Interviews Only Found Here at MetalCore!

 

Prime Evil 

This interview was originally to be included in Metal Core #31, and it is too good not to publish so read a great interview with Mary and buy the bands cd at all costs.


Prime Evil were a killer speed/thrash band back in the late 80's. Sadly they never got a record deal after putting out 3 fantastic demos. King from Old Metal Records recently released all of the bands material on cd for the 1st time. The band sounds as fresh today as they did back then. I got in touch with good friend Mary Ciullo after many years of having no contact with her after I met her at last years NJ metal meltdown and here is an interview with her. I have Prime Evil cds for $12 and they are more than worth it. Killer speed/thrash metal in the vein of Dark Angel. Buy or be a poser!


CF: HOW ARE YOU MARY? BEFORE WE TALK ABOUT THE PAST, LETS TALK ABOUT THE PRESENT FOR ABIT. WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN UP TO SINCE THE BREAK-UP OF THE BAND? WERE YOU OFFERED ANY OTHER POSITIONS IN ANY OTHER BANDS?
MC: I've been taking up space, like lawn furniture-that about summarizes my activities since we broke the band up. I believe I had some offers to join local bands right away after we disbanded, but they happened too immediately. I don't think I was ready to play bass in a band other than Prime Evil. I probably gave the impression to those that asked and to whom I declined, too. As if I was "too good" for others? Not even. I politely refused because I knew I couldn't put my heart and mind into a new (to me) band. That
absolutely HAS to happen if you want your project to be successful.

CF: HOW DID PRIME EVIL FORM AND HOW DID YOU JOIN THE BAND?
MC: I don't know and I don't know respectively. Well, let's see. ..I believe Prime Evil formed in January of 1986 and existed for a year before I joined in January of 1987. The only members that got through the first year were the 3 guys started it: Mike Usifer-guitar, Gary Day-guitar and Andy Eichhorn-vocals. I think even Gary quit and re-joined over the course of 1986. I ended up joining the band because a mutual friend of Andy's and myself introduced us at a Slayer show of all coincidental places. Shades of all things to come. 

CF: WHAT WERE THE EARLY DAYS OF THE BAND LIKE? DO YOU REMEMBER WHERE YOU PLAYED YOUR FIRST SHOW? WHAT WERE SOME EARLY COVER TUNES YOU DID? DID THE BAND SOUND LIKE PRIME EVIL IN ITS EARLY FORM?
MC: My early days in the band were like a train wreck-they had no drummer. I'd go up there to practice and there was NO means of timekeeping-it was kinda silly. I almost told them that "I'm sorry I can't do this", cause they'd give me a tape with guitar playing
Only on it and want me to "learn" it. When I finally expressed difficulty with the situation, Andy asked me a question: "Well do you know of anybody that plays drums?" So I said "Yeah, but you're gonna have to call him yourself. I wanted to jam with him last summer, but he turned me down. He won't get into a band with a chick." Looking back, it's amazing that Prime Evil even happened Anyway, Andy called the drummer Tad Leger, told him what we were wanting to do...and he agreed to play with us, me included. 
Oh boy. We played our first show at someone's house party, in the recreation room. Our set was always the same: half Prime Evil Evil originals, half Slayer (83-86) covers. That's all we could play together. We probably sounded like a car crash too. I know that's what all the girls at the party thought. You could tell by the way they scattered from the room. Great sight!

CF: HOW LONG WERE YOU TOGETHER BEFORE YOU BUT OUT YOUR FIRST DEMO? WHERE DID YOU RECORD IT AND WHAT WAS IT CALLED? WERE YOU HAPPY WITH IT AT THE TIME?
MC: 4 months. Not nearly long enough looking back. We recorded it at a studio in Dutchess Country, NY called 'Electric Reels." Andy was attending Dutchess Community College at the time, working on his degree in communications. Part of the requirement was to complete an apprenticeship program of some sort, so Andy was working nights at the studio as an assistant engineer. He made the arrangements, booked the time and got us a discount. We did everything in a day, except the mixing (mistake.) We were arguing quite loudly by the end of the session. Tad was an hour and a half late, we ran out of tape, my voice cracked doing backing vocals in the song "Prime Evil", Mike was mad because his friend said his soles sounded exactly like Kerry King (Slayer) in front of everyone. Andy recorded a songs worth of solos on the wrong take...joys of analog recording! Was I happy with it at the time? I was happy we were done and I could go home...I'd had it by then! On yeah-my car practically ran out of gas on the way back-Andy had to taken it to go get dinner food.

CF: HOW DID YOU GO PROMOTING THE TAPE? WHAT AS IT LIKE PLAYING SHOWS BACK THEN? DID YOU TRY AND USE THE TAPE TO GET SIGNED?
MC: Andy was just happy to just give the tapes away, which got me a little upset. We sent them to magazines and fanzinesFor that we read and filled our pockets with them when we went to shows. Yeah, the intent all along was to try and get signed.-that was our goal from day one. We couldn't play shows for a long time cause Tad quit us to join Toxic. We were approached by a drummer that went to college with Andy; his name was Todd Gukelberger. He was in a hardcore band called 'Leprosy" that I had only heard of. I was skeptical the day we drove up to his house to jam/audition him, but my skepticism was COMPLETELY unfounded. Todd's skill level was terrific, he is one of the best musicians I've been lucky enough to play with. Outstanding talent. Never has heard of a clock though....

CF: You then released a very popular 2nd demo. How did that come out? You became very popular within the underground. Did you think with this tape you would get signed?

MC: By the time we recorded the demo your talking about "The Manifestation", I felt we had improved considerably as a band. It was now 16 months since our first self-titled demo and we were practicing regularly, writing and playing area shows periodically so that helped. We didn't sound like a mess anymore. As you said, it was strong enough to put us on the underground map, but ultimately not convincing enough to get us signed. 

CF: I KNOW YOU WERE COMPARED TO DARK ANGEL A LOT. DO YOU THINK THAT WAS A FAIR COMPARASSION? WHAT WERE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE BANDS AND SHOWS YOU SAW BACK THEN?
MC: I guess comparing us to Dark Angel was somewhat fair, they were real fast-we had some fast stuff too. I mean at the time, I myself praised Dark Angel to the highest cloud, so although I didn't agree with the comparisons I didn't find them insulting neither. You probably already know the answer to this, but my favorite bands then were both Dark Angel and Death. I listened to both bands everyday. When they both did a tour together in April in 1989, oh man I just thought that was the greatest thing since sliced bread! My friends and I traveled more than a 1000 miles in a week just following the tour in the Northeast. The 2 bands didn't get along, but that was none of my affair. Their job was to play, my job was to go right up front, suffer the damage and be metal. It was delirium!

CF: HOW WAS THE MORAL OF THE BAND AT THIS POINT AFTER STILL NOT HAVING A DEAL? LOOKING BACK WOULD YOU HAVE DONE ANYTHING DIFFERENTLY? 
MC; The moral of the band was not necessarily low, but it could have been better. Although "The Manifestation" demo did not net us an album contract like we wanted we were getting offers from indie and upstart labels to release one or all of the demo songs 
Formats on other formats than tape ot to appear compilations. While all the attention was nice and much appreciated, with the exception of tape complications, we always politely declined. Well-except in one instance. A then employee of Combat Records
(George Grant) asked us if we wanted to contribute to an LP he was compiling that was to be called "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death." Seeing that as a possible way of getting in good with the likes of Combat Records, a label we would have signed with had they asked, we agreed. I paid to have an open-reel tape of the song "The Manifestation" made and I mailed it to George, signed his little agreement to give him permission to use our song. Needless to say, that was the last we heard from George. So, looking back would I have done differently? Yes I would have said "no" to George and saved myself the hassle.

CF: CAN YOU RECALL ANY FUNNY REVIEWS THE BAND GOT? DID YOU SAVE MOST OF YOUR REVIEWS AND STUFF? 
MC: You could say I was a mild archivist, I saved whatever I saw. Among some of the funnier things I read was a zine called "Amplified Assault" saying: 'These guys are more than just heavy and mean, they're heavy and about as mean as a sociopath strangling a defenseless young child with a fishing line! I'd recommend this to one and all, but in reality this is really for those deranged animals who watch movies like Faces of Death for its comical value." A zine called "The Rage of Violence" said "This demo ends with "The Sin of Innocence." This song would have made Ghandi jump into the pit and kick ass. Check out the lyrics to this one; this is one of the PRMC favorites." "The Book of Armageddon" even said, "Now here's a band after my own heart."I gotta say, overall the press was very kind to us. 

CF: I KNOW YOU DID AN INDUSTRY ONLY DEMO. WHAT LABELS DID YOU SEND IT TO? WAS THERE ANY SERIOUS OFFERS? WHAT DO YOU THINK WAS THE PROBLEM WITH THE BAND NOT GETTING SIGNED?
MC: I can't remember every label that we sent the demo to. Let's put it this way: if Andy or I had heard of it, they were remotely linked with metal music and we had their address, then we submitted a tape. Most companies were even proper enough to send their Xeroxed, format rejection letter...but some couldn't even be bothered with that. I don't know exactly what you deem a serious offer, but I would say we had several cases of "interest". Robert Kampf from Century Media was in America for the Foundations Forum and he made arrangements to come watch us rehearse. He saw Demolition Hammer rehearse while here too.... and that's who got the contract. Opps. We had 2 chapters of teasing from a Canadian label called Maze Music. Their president Zoran Busik had the bright idea to open a US office in the NY area and call the subdivision "Kraze America". They got this guy John Morris from Brooklyn, NY to operate A & R from their office located on Long Island. To give you an idea of the level of genius we are considering here, John solicits 2 area bands with a following: Biohazard and Repulsion 9ex Carnivore). The label can only handle one contract mind you. John tells Repulsion they can have a contract if they change their name cause a certain grind band from Michigan already has the rights. Anyone reading this who was born in 1970 or earlier will know who I am talking about, all others check Ebay. Anew, Repulsion does just that (you've heard of Type O Negative right?) and signs to a real label, which leaves Kraze to pursue Biohazard, who they sign. Then the label decides they will imminently be rich and proceeds to actively court a number of other unsigned bands with a good following; simultaneously. They sign one (a Great one, at that) from NJ called Ripping Corpse. The label could clearly not afford the plans they were undertaking. They had 2 contracts from 2 different A & R guys (Stuart Morales being the second) back and forth with Prime Evil alone, and they were actively jerking around Sheer Terror from Yonkers, Fester 9from FL) and a lot more than I'll never know about! I obviously know why we were not signed to Kraze, but I don't believe I know why no other label signed us. Maybe it was because of me. (maybe we had some idiot A & R people-chris)

CF: YOU ALSO PUT OUT A 7" ON RAGE RECORDS. WHY A 7"? HOW DID IT SELL? I GUESS COPIES GO FOR A NICE CHUNK OF MONEY NOW HUH?
MC: Why a 7"? Why not? We hadn't put out a public release in more than 3 years when Ed Farshtey (wonder where he is now-chris) and Joe Pupo from Rage Records suggested the idea to us. Ed didn't even have to finish asking me, cause I was always the strongest supporter of the vinyl format. My bandmates agreed to the idea, but with a little stipulation. I couldn't provide Rage a band photo where you could see Todd Gukelberger, the drummer who played on the included songs (Terminal Dementia and Global Degradation). Todd had quit the band by then and one of the founding members refused to release something bearing Todd's likeness. I got to pick the vinyl color (red like the cover of The Manifestation demo) and although you can't see him, Todd is represented by the 7" release anyway. He drew our band logo and the maze of twisted, tortured ghouls that are on the cover. Ed says he made a 1000 of the singles and the numbering got messed up when he and Joe did it by hand, so dual serial numbers exist. 
He also said all the copies were gone in about 3 or 4 months, the fastest moving 7" he did. I honestly don't know if their value has increased over time-I never thought about it.

CF: WHAT LED TO THE BREAK UP OF THE BAND? WERE YOU SORRY TO SEE IT END? WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE TIMES AND WORST TIMES WITH THE BAND?
CF: Members quitting was what led to us breaking up. We planned it, we didn't fall about or have a falling out. In November of 91Todd comes to practice one night and dropped a bombshell on us-he said he was leaving and that this was his last rehearsal. After the second "false alarm" we had with Maze/Kraze, I think he got discouraged. He said he wanted to continue his higher education by going to a Graduate Art College that was outof the area. If Prime Evil had signed a record contract, then he would have stayed
with the band for however far we went. But when that didn't happen, he couldn't see any sense in staying with a band that was costing him money and playing in a scene where the music industry didn't want us. Although I hated what he was saying and I knew what him quitting the band meant, I could hardly argue his point. We taped rehearsal that night so we could teach our newer material to whoever his replacement would be. (the songs are on that cd.) There was never any thought about breaking the band up at that point. Mike Usifer called a drummer friend the next day, told him what happened and within 24 hours we had a new drummer. His name was Matt Mayfield, he had been in a hardcore band called "Violent Plague" and was a longtime Prime Evil fan. About 5 or 6 months went by, but we couldn't play out cause Matt was not tight enough with us yet. It was during this time that the 7" was released. In June of 92, Gary Day makes an announcement at the end of practice that he is leaving Prime Evil and he does not wish us to continue to using his material. Gary and Mike wrote or co-wrote almost every note of Prime Evil's music, so Gary leaving created this 40% musical hole. Gary said he no longer enjoyed playing in the band, that it was like a job he went to after his day job. We had already scheduled a show for July in Manhattan, NY with Incantation and like 5 other bands that we did not want to cancel. Andy had to be vigorously encouraged to keep his plan to play the gig as our last show ever-when he heard how we sounded as a 4 piece, he wanted to cancel and fold up tent right there. But we did it, with the thought we would be a band right until the last song. We told no one beforehand, made no announcement, just a very humble ending., Matt cut his thumb badly just a couple days before the show-he practiced with us and played the show with a huge bandage. I don't know how he held onto the stick...our songs weren't exactly a waltz! Was I sorry to see it end? Oh yeah. Easily one of the best experiences of my life. I had a lot of favorite times with the band it's hard to pick one. Playing out of town and getting a strong reception was always gratifying to me personally. I just felt good seeing that something I was involved with was giving someone else a good time. The worst times mellow with time, I suppose...the worst things I can remember actually had to do with Andy. We never rehearsed nearby where I lived, so I always had a bit of a drive (an average of an hour) to get to practice. Well I have a real fear of thunderstorms. I have had it my whole life. If the weather was violent or going to get violent, I'd have to call Andy to tell him I was afraid to go to practice. Andy was non-tolerant of this, he gave me a lot of grief. I felt like a pud because I was sacred to go outside. When we were learning "Sin of Innocence", I asked Andy if we could use some different words in place of a few derogatory vulgar ones he had written. We got in a big argument at practice in front of everyone over that. He told me if I didn't like it, I could just quit. They'd get someone else. I figured if I didn't quit, they'd just kick me out me out anyway for being a girl. For the next few months I went to practice everyday fully expecting to be fired. They didn't boot me out and I didn't quit...so I suppose that is a good thing.

CF; I KNOW YOU DID SOME WRITING FOR SOME MAGZINES. ARE YOU STILL DOING THIS? HOW DID THE BAND COME UP WITH THE NAME PRIME EVIL? HAVE YOU PLAYED IN ANY BANDS BESIDES PRIME EVIL?
MC: I didn't write anything for any fanzines. I never wrote articles, biographies or reviews. What I did do was conduct and/or contribute interviews to "Voices from the Darkside" and "Snakepit." Some of the interviews I conducted and transcribed myself, others were transcribed by me with someone else doing the interviewing. I edited and contributed other writer's biographies too. The only time something was printed by me was actually written by me was something like this here: an interview where I was answering. I can't write, I can't compose music and I'm horrible at public speaking-but I feel like I am at least some organized, clerical and have grammar skills. That's why I did a lot of mail and wrote a lot of the written interviews for Prime Evil. The only things I've done public music-wise since the band broke up was to sit in a couple of times during 96 with Incantation (I did a promo and 3 live shows) and I did a demo with Malicious Onslaught in 97.

CF: WHAT DO YOUTHINK OF THE WHOLE COMPUTER AND INTERENT THING? HAVE YOU SEEN ANY PRIME EVIL WEB SITES AND WILL THERE EVER BE ONE?
MC: Home computers and the internet are nice, but I don't have any of that stuff. At present, I still consider the PC to be a luxury, not a necessity...speaking for myself, of course. I use a public access computer for information periodically, and occasionally I send email or buy something through a friend's computer. Your kind of asking the wrong person about knowledge of any P.E website. . Ansy Eichhorn would know that. And I surely don't have plans to build one, if one goes UP, it sure won't be from the mouse of Mary. 

CF: I KNOW YOU COLLECT RECORDS. ANY ITEMS YOUR LOOKING FOR? WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE ITEM YOU HAVE IN YOUR COLLECTION?
MC: Yeah, I collect records. I especially like picture discs and colored vinyl. I have a short list of wants that changes very often as I locate things and decide there is other items I'd like to have. There's a record I've been looking for a long time that I've never been able to find. Noise Records of Germany re-issued "Terrible Certainty" by Kreator on red vinyl. I've haven't ever seen one. The favorite item in my collection? Hmmm-that's a tough one, cause there's a few. "First Strike" by Def Leppard...don't laugh. While on the subject, there's someone I'd like to thank for getting me records I'd never own, were it not for: Chris Mclaughlin. Thank you! I really appreciate all your assistance. 

CF: I KNOW THE SCEN HAS CHANGED OVER THE YEARS. DO YOU THINK IT HAS CHANGED FOR THE GOOD OR THE BETTER?
MC: I agree with you, but it's tough to say, because one person's good or better if someone else's bad or worse ya know? It's easier to get a deal, because there are more indie companies. It's harder to get recognized, because there are more indie companies with releases out. It's easier to record and produce your material because technology has advanced, brought the price down and put it in the musician's hands. There's more "bands" that are one or 2-man projects because technology has made it 
Unnecessary to assemble a line-up. People use to gladly go to a concert with a headliner and one support band and deem the show a great deal. People will gladly stay home with friends, drink.burn/trip and watch bootleg concert videos of a dozen different bands nowadays because it is less trouble. Like I said how it was/how it is/how it will be is all a matter of opinion...it depends on the individual. I will say one thing-enjoy whatever it is that you have, however little it may be...anything is always better than nothing at all.

CF: WHAT ARE SOME NEW BANDS THAT YOU LIKE AND OLD BANDS YOU THINK PEOPLE SHOULD SEEK OUT?
MC: Earlier metal bands I always liked are Motorhead and Venom. Bands that started in the late 80's that I still call favorites today are Immolation and Incantation. I guess a band is only "new" once, then never again-so that's a tough call. Bands that I really like with just one album out are Soulreaper and The Ravenous. Some bands that crush whom aren't household names (yet!) are: Dim Mak, Severance and Scepter...from NJ, TX and IL respectively in case anyone needs to know.

CF: HOW DID IT COME TO BE THAT YOUR STUFF FINALLY CAME OUT ON CD? WERE THERE ANY OTHER OFFERS? DOES THE WHOLE BAND KNOW ABOUT THE CD? IS THERE ANY LEFTOVER SONGS YOU LEFT OFF? ANY CHANCE OF A LIVE CD OR RE-UNION SHOW?
MC: This is kind of a long story. To avoid angering myself, I'll try to explain it in concise terms. Sometime in 1997, Jeroen of Damnation Productions from The Netherlands called me several times to ask if I'd allow him to release the first two Prime Evil demos as a 2-side 12" EP. I thought that was a great idea, being the dedicated vinyl supporter I am. I checked with those who actually wrote the material because I would never give permission for someone else to use music that I never wrote. Everyone thought that a re-release would be nice, but why were we not re-releasing it on cd? Why on vinyl only? I explained that there remains a huge and loyal vinyl market in Europe where the label was located and where they would probably be selling most of the 500 copies that they were planning to press. Besides-if we did this 8 song ep, perhaps someone in America would license it for cd at a later date. SO we agreed it would be okay and I told Jeroen to proceed. I got together some pictures and artwork, plus I had the first and second demo transferred to digital format. That turned out to be a lot of work! Well, that project never 'caught on fire" and in the meantime I was asked twice by Jeff at Bad Posture Records did I want to do a Prime Evil cd? I told him we already had a deal pending with Damnation, but we asked him what he had in mind. He suggested a college for a layout, to use a colorized flyer. For a cover and to have a musical hodge-podge of demo songs,covers and live tracks. I mentioned the proposal to Andy and he was really keyed on having our material on cd...but, like myself, wanted a finished package that was polished and professional looking. I asked Damnation to be excused from the ep project and they agreed no problem. As for doing a cd layout, because I'd saved so much band memorabilia I had a good idea and I'd have stuff for a nice booklet. Because I don't have a computer and no layout experience, I had no idea how to get started. I asked our first drummer Tad Leger if a prior offer to help was good and he said "sure." I told Bad Posture we'd give him a ready to print/press cd. Since Prime Evil never had an album release when we existed, I thought this would be our only and last chance to show ourselves to the public. I wanted to put our best possible foot forward. I had the rest of the music prepared for digital format and I provided text files along with artwork scraps for Tad to create a cd package layout. If you ask me, Tad outdid himself-made the packaging look about 300% better than I was hoping for. After making some changes that Jeff requested, we finally finished the job and submitted everything to his printer. Well that was the last we ever heard of Jeff. He and his partner abandoned the project and said nothing to us. SO I offered the whole thing to Damnation as a cd and they said they would like to do it, except they had other projects planned for release before ours. Fair enough, I thought. After waiting for more than a year, they informed me that their plans changed and that they wouldn't be releasing it after all. I then offered it to King from Battle Zone Records because he inquired about Prime Evil's material in the past. I realize hindsight is 20/20, but I think I should have worked with King in the first place. He was professional, prompt and had the cd out and for sale within 4 months of me bringing the files to him. Whew! Good job. Every song Prime Evil did is on there-no covers, no live stuff. I wanted to be complete, but not cross over formats. The quality of the recordings depends on where/how it was done. Some is studio, some is rehearsal. I included all the lyrics too-cause Andy was writing towards the end of the band was so well-researched and constructed...for what he had to say it was much too intelligent and meaningful to be trashed. Yeah, we divided up what King gave to us out of the 1000 he made. I would not rule out a live-only cd one day, but don't hold your breath. Same deal with a re-union show-it's not impossible, but it's highly unlikely. 

CF: ARE YOU 100% HAPPY WITH THE RELEASE OF YOUR MUSIC ON CD? DOES IT SOUND WEIRD TO HEAR YOUR MUSIC ON A DISC? DID LOTS OF OLD FEELINGS GO THROUGH YOU AS YOU WERE REMASTERING THE SONGS?
MC: I am 100% happy that P.E. now has a reasonably complete collection of music available. I am not 100% happy with the fact that the packaging is missing some information that is should have, but I obviously can't do a thing about that now! For anyone that has it, and cares, here's what supposed to appear on the back tray cover, under the photo: 2001 Battlezone Evil Music (ASCAP) All Rights Reseved. Unauthorized Duplication is a Violation of Applicable Laws. And all that should be in a bright red box. So we have a cd out with no record identification, no copyright statement and no publishing disclosure. All the important info to identify and protect ourselves does not appear, that kinda bothers me. Besides that, it makes the cd look like a bootleg and that it's not. The feeling I experienced as I was having the music mastered-and keep in mind this was done by 2 different engineers doing 2 different groups of songs at 2 different times-was worry. Mastering is very expensive and very time consuming. I was wondering how I was gonna pay for it! Once I got the finished product in the mail though, I opened one, fired it right in the cd player and blew down my house with it! After all the work, the letdowns and the waiting...at long last it felt SO worth it. What a wonderful feeling of satisfaction.

CF: ANY CHANCE OF SHIRTS BEING RELEAED? WELL HERE I INTERVIEWW WAY BACK IN ISSUE 13 AND HERE I AM INTERVIEWING YOU AGAIN. P.E. RULED BACK THEN AND STILL DO TODAY. ANY LAST WORDS AND THANKS FOR DOING THIS CHAT WITH ME I HOPE THE READERS WILL SEEK YOUR MSUIC OUT ON CD.
MC: I don't have plans to screen shirts-why you need one, Chris? (damn right mary if you have one send it-chris). Yeah you edited lots of what I said for that interview in issue 13! You interviewed me to take the place of a spoken interview you had done with my singer Andy, guitarist Gary and drummer Todd. That you lost! Probably better off though-I saw those 3 right after they talked to you and they were all drunk! But I'd like to thank you for all your kind words and your support past and present, Chris. I'm glad you enjoyed what we had to offer as a band. Last words? You almost snapped my hand in half when you shook it at Metal Meltdown in NJ. Please be careful, I need that hand. Again on behalf of myself and the Prime Evil-thanks for the attention. Much appreciated.
MARY CIULLO 356 ALPINE DR CORTLANDT, NY 10567-1327